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eCommerce Journal Authors: Shelly Palmer, Suresh Sambandam, Jnan Dash, Kevin Sides, Nate Vickery

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AWS Re-Invent 2017

In a few decades when the history of computing will be written, a major section will be devoted to cloud computing. The headline of the first section would read something like this – How did a dot-com era book-selling company became the father of cloud computing? While the giants like IBM, HP, and Microsoft were sleeping, Amazon started a new business eleven years ago in 2006 called AWS (Amazon Web Services). I still remember the afternoon when I had spent couple of hours with the CTO of Amazon (not Warner Vogel, his predecessor, a dutch gentleman) back in 2004 discussing the importance of SOA (service Oriented Architecture). When I asked why was he interested, he mentioned how CEO Jeff Bezos has given a marching order to monetize the under-utilized infrastructure in their data centers. Thus AWS arrived in 2006 with S3 for storage and EC2 for computing.

Advance the clock by 11 years. At this week’s AWS Re-Invent event in Las Vegas it was amazing to listen to Andy Jassy, CEO of AWS who gave a 2.5 hour keynote on how far AWS has come. There were 43,000 people attending this event (in its 6th year) and another 60,000 were tuned in via the web. AWS has a revenue run rate of $18B with a 42% Year-to-Year growth. It’s profit is over 60% thus contributing significantly to Amazon’s bottom line. It has hundreds of thousands of customers starting from majority web startups to Fortune 500 enterprise players in all verticals. It has the strongest partner ecosystem. Garter group said AWS has a market share of 44.1% (39% last year), larger than all others combined. Customers like Goldman Sachs, Expedia, and National Football League were on stage showing how they fully switched to AWS for all their development and production.

Andy covered four major areas – computing, database, analytics, and machine learning with many new announcement of services. AWS already offers over 100 services. Here is a brief overview.

  • Computing – 3 major areas: Instances of EC2 including new GPU processor for AI, Containers (services such as Elastic Container Services and new ones like EKS – Elastic Kubernetes Services), and Serverless (Function as a Service with its Lambda services). The last one, Serverless is gaining fast traction in just last 12 months.
  • Database – AWS is starting to give real challenge to incumbents like Oracle, IBM and Microsoft. It has three offerings – AWS Aurora RDBMS for transaction processing, DynamoDB and Redshift. Andy announced Aurora Multi-Master for replicated read and writes across data centers and zones. He claims it is the first RDBMS with scale-out across multiple data centers and is lot cheaper than Oracle’s RAC solution. They also announced Aurora Serverless for on-demand, auto-scaling app dev. For No-SQL, AWS has DynamoDB (key-value store). They also have Amazon Elastic Cache for in-memory DB. Andy announced Dynamo DB Global Tables as a fully-managed, multi-master, multi-region DB for customers with global users (such as Expedia). Another new service called Amazon Neptune was announced for highly connected data (fully managed Graph database). They also have Redshift for data warehousing and analytics.
  • Analytics – AWS provides Data Lake service on S3 which enables API access to any data in its native form. They have many services like Athena, Glue, Kinesis to access the data lake. Two new services were announced – S3 Select (a new API to select and retrieve S3 data from within an object), Glacier Select (access less frequently used data in the archives).
  • Machine Learning – Amazon claims it has been using machine learning for 20 years in its e-commerce business to understand user’s preferences. A new service was announced called Amazon Sagemaker which brings storage, data movement, management of hosted notebook, and ML algorithms like 10 top commonly used ones (eg. Time Series Forecasting). It also accommodates other popular libraries like Tensorflow, Apache MxNet, and Caffe2. Once you pick an algorithm, training is much easier with Sagemaker. Then with one-click, the deployment happens. Their chief AI fellow Dr. Matt Wood demonstrated on stage how this is all done. They also announced AWS DeepLens, a video camera for developers with a computer vision model. This can detect facial recognition and image recognition for apps. New services announced besides the above two are – Amazon Kinesis Video streams (video ingestion), Amazon Transcribe (automatic speech recognition), Amazon Translate (between languages), and Amazon Comprehend (fully managed NLP – Natural Language Processing).

It was a very impressive and powerful presentation and shows how deeply committed and dedicated the AWS team is. Microsoft Azure cloud, Google’s computing cloud, IBM’s cloud and Oracle’s cloud all seem way behind in terms of AWS’s breadth and depth. It will be to customer’s benefit to have couple of AWS alternatives as we march along the cloud computing highway. Who wants a single-vendor lock-in?


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More Stories By Jnan Dash

Jnan Dash is Senior Advisor at EZShield Inc., Advisor at ScaleDB and Board Member at Compassites Software Solutions. He has lived in Silicon Valley since 1979. Formerly he was the Chief Strategy Officer (Consulting) at Curl Inc., before which he spent ten years at Oracle Corporation and was the Group Vice President, Systems Architecture and Technology till 2002. He was responsible for setting Oracle's core database and application server product directions and interacted with customers worldwide in translating future needs to product plans. Before that he spent 16 years at IBM. He blogs at http://jnandash.ulitzer.com.